ORL Progress Notes Newsletter
  December 2, 2010
 

Welcome!

Martin J. Citardi, MD, FACS

Welcome to the last issue of ORL Progress Notes for 2010.
In this issue, we share story of a patient who presented with a large neck mass from a unknown primary tumor.  Dr. Karni used robotic surgery as part of this patient's treatment.  He and Dr. Weinstock discuss the optimal management of oropharyngeal carcinoma, including the role of robotic surgery.  It is often stated that medical knowledge is not static--smart physicians consistently re-assess all available information and incorporate new information into their day-to-day interactions with patients.  Certainly, the application of robotic surgery to the challenge of oropharngeal carcinoma illustrates this well. 
In addition, Dr. Alexander describes her multidisciplinary approach for benign laryngeal conditions that cause hoarseness in otherwise health patients, and Dr.  Ho reports the role of functional rhinoplasty in a patient with nasal obstruction and obstructive sleep apnea.  Finally, three reports from the Texas Sinus Institute highlight new knowledge developed in Department. 
 

As always, we welcome your feedback and comments. Please feel free to contact us at any time—and to forward this newsletter to friends and colleagues. 
Have a great holiday season!

Martin J. Citardi, MD, FACS      e-mail

 
 

Finding the Unknown Primary in Head & Neck Cancer

In mid-summer 2010, 46-year-old Houstonian Paul Wyett found a found a small lump on his neck that he thought was an ingrown hair.  “It swelled up and then went away but never completely disappeared,” he says. His primary care physician suspected a nerve fiber tumor and referred him to an otolaryngologist, who did a needle
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A Meta-Analysis of Topical Amphotericin B for the Treatment of Chronic Rhinosinusitis

Rhinologists at the Texas Sinus Institute of the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston and Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center are engaged in research efforts that drive the innovation that provides tomorrow’s advances. The following report was presented at the 56th Annual Meeting of the American Rhinologic
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Cytokine Profile Comparison Between Inflamed Sinus Mucosa and Sinonasal Polyps from Chronic Rhinosinusitis

Rhinologists at the Texas Sinus Institute of the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston and Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center and are engaged in research efforts that drive the innovation that provides tomorrow’s advances.  The following report was presented at the 56th Annual Meeting of the American
Read more...

The Distribution of Normal Saline Delivered by Large-Particle Nasal Nebulizer versus Large-Volume/Low-Pressure Squeeze Bottle

Rhinologists at the Texas Sinus Institute of the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston and Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center and are engaged in research efforts that drive the innovation that provides tomorrow’s advances.  The following report was presented at the 56th Annual Meeting of the American
Read more...

Averting the “Limping Larynx” with a Multidisciplinary Approach

Otolaryngologist Ronda Alexander, MD, looks to orthopedic surgery as an analogy to explain the treatment of voice disorders.  “After a knee replacement or an ACL repair, the surgeon prescribes physical therapy to teach patients how to use the joint safely so that the replacement or repair lasts as long as possible,” says Dr. Alexander, who
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Repair of Nasal Obstruction with Functional Septorhinoplasty

For nearly 20 years, 45-year-old Susan Haase lived her life exhausted.  “I couldn’t understand why I was so tired,” Haase says.  “At first I thought it was a normal part of aging but I was only in my early 30s at the time.  When it got to the point that I was too tired to
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