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NEW! UFJ Autism and the Predictive Mind

Presented by: Peter Vermeulen, Ph.D.
Hosted by: UCF CARD
April 22, 2020

Jacksonville, FL
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Many ideas about the autistic brain are based on conceptions about the human brain that are outdated. The computer, as a metaphor for the brain, with its input, processing and output, has been very useful in the past, but seems to be incorrect in the light of recent discoveries in brain science. The brain is not a computer: the brain is guessing more than it is computing. The brain does not just receive information from the senses, it is actually using the senses to check its own guesses. Recent discoveries about the brain have led to a Copernican revolution, replacing the old idea of a receptive mind with the new idea of a predictive mind. That new idea invites us to take a different look at the autistic brain, but – more importantly – also to rethink some of the strategies we have been using in autism for decades. We will illustrate this in the areas of sensory issues, communication and emotion recognition, three areas known to be difficult for people with ASD.

NEW! UFJ Autism and and Happiness: Mission (Im)possible

Happiness has received little attention in the field of autism spectrum disorders. Outcome and effect studies, for instance, rarely take emotional well-being as a desired outcome. And when the focus is on well-being, it is often from a negative perspective, namely the lack of well-being and quality of life in autism. It is time to take a U-turn in our approach and change from an exclusive focus on what makes autism so different and from a negative, clinical and medical approach of happiness in people with autism (lack of distress) towards a shared and positive focus (we all want to be happy). In other words, let’s move from neurodiversity to neuroharmony.

Register

NEW! UFG Autism and the Predictive Mind

Presented by: Peter Vermeulen, Ph.D.
Hosted by: UFG CARD
April 21, 2020
9 AM - 12 PM

Gainesville, FL
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Many ideas about the autistic brain are based on conceptions about the human brain that are outdated. The computer, as a metaphor for the brain, with its input, processing and output, has been very useful in the past, but seems to be incorrect in the light of recent discoveries in brain science. The brain is not a computer: the brain is guessing more than it is computing. The brain does not just receive information from the senses, it is actually using the senses to check its own guesses. Recent discoveries about the brain have led to a Copernican revolution, replacing the old idea of a receptive mind with the new idea of a predictive mind. That new idea invites us to take a different look at the autistic brain, but – more importantly – also to rethink some of the strategies we have been using in autism for decades. We will illustrate this in the areas of sensory issues, communication and emotion recognition, three areas known to be difficult for people with ASD.

NEW! UFG Autism and and Happiness: Mission (Im)possible

Presented by: Peter Vermeulen, Ph.D.
Hosted by: UFG CARD
April 21, 2020
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Gainesville, FL

Happiness has received little attention in the field of autism spectrum disorders. Outcome and effect studies, for instance, rarely take emotional well-being as a desired outcome. And when the focus is on well-being, it is often from a negative perspective, namely the lack of well-being and quality of life in autism. It is time to take a U-turn in our approach and change from an exclusive focus on what makes autism so different and from a negative, clinical and medical approach of happiness in people with autism (lack of distress) towards a shared and positive focus (we all want to be happy). In other words, let’s move from neurodiversity to neuroharmony.

Register

NEW! UCF Autism and the Predictive Mind

Presented by: Peter Vermeulen, Ph.D.
Hosted by: UCF CARD
April 20, 2020

Orlando, FL
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Many ideas about the autistic brain are based on conceptions about the human brain that are outdated. The computer, as a metaphor for the brain, with its input, processing and output, has been very useful in the past, but seems to be incorrect in the light of recent discoveries in brain science. The brain is not a computer: the brain is guessing more than it is computing. The brain does not just receive information from the senses, it is actually using the senses to check its own guesses. Recent discoveries about the brain have led to a Copernican revolution, replacing the old idea of a receptive mind with the new idea of a predictive mind. That new idea invites us to take a different look at the autistic brain, but – more importantly – also to rethink some of the strategies we have been using in autism for decades. We will illustrate this in the areas of sensory issues, communication and emotion recognition, three areas known to be difficult for people with ASD.

NEW! UCF Autism and and Happiness: Mission (Im)possible

Happiness has received little attention in the field of autism spectrum disorders. Outcome and effect studies, for instance, rarely take emotional well-being as a desired outcome. And when the focus is on well-being, it is often from a negative perspective, namely the lack of well-being and quality of life in autism. It is time to take a U-turn in our approach and change from an exclusive focus on what makes autism so different and from a negative, clinical and medical approach of happiness in people with autism (lack of distress) towards a shared and positive focus (we all want to be happy). In other words, let’s move from neurodiversity to neuroharmony.

Register

NEW! Promising Pathways Conference: The Road to Best Practice in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Presented by: Brenda Smith Myles, Ph.D.
Hosted by: Florida Gulf Coast University
April 18, 2020

Fort Myers, FL 
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Each year we welcome 300—400 parents, educators, healthcare workers and community members interested in serving individuals with autism spectrum disorder to the Promising Pathways conference. Through donations from our generous community and business sponsors, we are able to continue to offer the conferences at no charge to attendees.

Details about speaker:
  • Over 3000 presentations worldwide, written over 300 articles and books on ASD
  • Former professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas
  • Former editor of Intervention in School and Clinic

 
Register

Proven Strategies for Teaching Reading to Struggling Learners

Presented by: Peggy Campbell-Rush, M.A.
Hosted by: UF Health/Jacksonville CARD, UF Health FDLRS – MDC
February 27, 2020

ONLINE
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Participants will learn ways to adapt classroom instruction when working with children who learn in different ways and at different rates. Participants will learn how to identify a struggling learner, and will gain practical ideas and strategies to help all learners succeed. Participants will learn how to enhance what they are already doing to target the struggling learner, will gain insights into the struggling learner’s capabilities and needs, and will receive ideas on how to assist all students.

Register

Leveling UP! Comprehensive Support for Emotional Regulation

Presented by: Amy Laurent, PhD, OTR/L & Jacquelyn Fede, PhD
Hosted by: UM-NSU CARD
April 4, 2020

Fort Lauderdale, FL
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This session introduces a comprehensive suite of emotional regulation supports developed by Autism Level UP! Participants will have interactive opportunities use the tools/strategies presented while considering an autistic individual in their lives. Modifications for the supports will be discussed for individuals at a variety of developmental levels (e.g., students who are not yet communicating using words, those who are emerging language learners, and those who are conversational).

Register
Interested in the Partnership Program? Visit our website for more information!
                                     
This product was developed by the Partnership for Effective Programs for Students with ASD, a project funded by the State of Florida, Department of Education K-12 Public Schools, Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student Services, through federal assistance under the
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Part B.
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Copyright © 2020 Partnership for Effective Programs for Students with Autism, All rights reserved.


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