Throughout my childhood and into my teens, I carried around a piece of paper in my wallet that said: “be well off by 35”. It was my only goal in life other than becoming a pilot in the Air Force but my low self-esteem prevented me from achieving that goal.

I never considered myself good enough for a lot of things, actually, but that’s another story for another day.

The other goal of being well off by 35, however, was and still is on my mind since I was a child. A lot of people pick the round number of 30 years old but I didn’t.

I gave myself an extra five years as a cushion for mistakes. Mistakes I’ve talked about in the past, mistakes that I’ve learned from, and mistakes I have yet to make.

Now that I’m entering my 35th year on this Earth. I feel much wiser and filled with a lot more hope than I have in the past.

I feel like I am starting to finally come into my own. Everything I have learned in the past has been put into this current project of mine and it is starting to pay off.

And to clarify, when I was a kid, being “well off” meant being rich.

It meant having all the cool gadgets, a big house, and cool cars.

By the way, my dream car is a replica of the Jurassic Park jeep that I sometimes see in the Inland Empire.

But as I grew older, my definition of “well off” has changed dramatically.

To me, it means being happy with what you do in life no matter what.

There are millionaires who are miserable and there are people who make a minimum wage that is much happier.

Because in the end, if you aren’t happy with what you do, then what’s the point?
STUFF TO CHECK OUT

The Journey of Reclusive Rage Against the Machine Frontman Zack de la Rocha

Air Jordan III: The Shocking Story of the Greatest Shoe Jordan Never Wanted.

How Your Diet Affects Your Mental Health.
Thanks for reading,
P.S. Don't forget to subscribe to my Onward and Upward podcast on Apple PodcastsSpotifyStitcher, or Google Play. New episodes every Friday!
 
    

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Jamie Pham · PO Box 1064 · Temple City, CA 91780 · USA

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