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Latest Issue | Archives | News | Forums | Protocols 09/17/2012

Genomics

Fine-tuning Stem Cell Imaging

By Melissa Lee Phillips
Genome editing allows precise integration of reporter genes into stem cells.

More News >>

Plus

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Posters & Protocols

The BioTechniques Poster Hall and Protocol Guide features sponsored posters and protocols that provide information about specific methods.

labeling and detection

Enhanced detection sensitivity of luciferase reporter gene assays

New reagents and instrumentation have recently been introduced by PerkinElmer to meet the demanding needs of reporter gene assays. The EnSpire™ Multilabel Plate Reader is now available with ultra-sensitive, dual reporter luminescence detection capability and an easy to use graphical user interface. The newly released neolite™ luciferase assay system provides a further increase in sensitivity, while maintaining a signal half-life that enables batch processing of assay plates for medium throughput applications. The performance of EnSpire™ for a luciferase reporter gene assay was demonstrated by measuring a dilution series of firefly luciferase with the neolite™ assay system.

 

High Throughput

Predictive Assays for High Throughput Assessment of Cardiac Toxicity and Drug Safety

A large percentage of new drugs fail in clinical studies due to cardiac toxicity. Therefore development of highly predicative in vitro assays suitable for high throughput screening (HTS) is extremely important for drug development. Human cardiomyocytes derived from stem cell sources can greatly accelerate the development of new chemical entities and improve drug safety by offering more clinically relevant cell-based models than those presently available. Stem cell derived cardiomyocytes are especially attractive because they express ion channels and demonstrate spontaneous mechanical and electrical activity similar to native cardiac cells. Here we demonstrate cell based assays for measuring the impact of pharmacological compounds on the rate of beating cardiomyocytes with different assay platforms.

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Cellectis bioresearch’s Cell Line Customization Services
Renowned gene customization engineers modify your cell line at any position in any cell type. Fastest turnaround time in the market! Our services include gene modification, gene knock-out and targeted integration.
All included services come with dedicated support of an expert to keep you updated through the whole project and to answer all your questions.  

More info>>

Most viewed:
Comment on this Retraction: Reader Free to Criticize Journal's Decisions

New forum post:
PCR with more than one primer 

Peer-reviewed:
Whole-mount imaging of the mouse hindlimb vasculature using the lipophilic carbocyanine dye DiI.

New Podcast:
Next Generation Model Organisms | BenchTalk, Episode 4

New product:
Manual Repeater Pipette

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