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Eneclann Newsletter

In this issue:

Back to Our Past 2013

Other Upcoming Talks

New Blog: Genealogy as Economic Opportunity

Eneclann in History Ireland

News of a New Face at our Joint Venture Partners






Dear Eneclann customer,

Back To Our Past 2013

We’re absolutely delighted to be part of the Back To Our Past show once more – we’ll be at the RDS on Friday, Saturday and Sunday next (October 18-20) so don’t be afraid to call in and say hello.

As always there is a packed schedule for the three days, and Eneclann’s Fiona Fitzsimons and Brian Donovan will be giving talks on the Friday and Sunday afternoons.

Fiona’s talk in the presentation hall is entitled “Mere Gentry & Aristocracy, or a mirror of Irish Society? Tracing your Irish Ancestry in the Registry of Deeds"

The Registry of Deeds is commonly understood to detail the upper classes of society, but as Fiona will point out the records cover a much wider demographic, so family history enthusiasts should ignore them at their peril.

The talk “Mere Gentry & Aristocracy, or a Mirror of Irish Society? Tracing your Irish ancestry in the Registry of Deeds” takes place on Friday, October 18th at 3.45pm.

Meanwhile, on Sunday, also in the presentation hall, Brian Donovan will give a talk named “Landlords & Tenants: Land and estate records for Irish family history research”.

This talk takes place at 1.30pm on Sunday, October 20th.

We’d also like to point you in the direction of another interesting presentation at the Back To Our Past show which has its roots in these quarters.

Cliona Weldon, of our sister company findmypast.ie, will give an introduction to using the service at 11.30am on Saturday, October 19th in a talk entitled “More than just names and dates: Starting your family history with findmypast.ie”.

Keep an eye on the Eneclann Facebook page (we won’t object if you “Like” us!) over the next few days. We’ll be giving away some tickets to the Back To Our Past show if you’d like to come along.

You’ll find lots more information over on the official Back To Our Past website here.



Other Upcoming Talks

In addition to Back To Our Past there is lots of other stuff going on, and Fiona will be busy with three other talks over the next nine days.

Firstly, this afternoon (Saturday, September 12th) at the Gilbert Library on Pearse Street, Dublin, there’s another chance to catch “Records of Irish children in care, ca. 1840s to 1952”, where Fiona looks at the different sources that survive for a fascinating insight into the background of Irish children in care over the course of more than a century.

We mentioned in the last newsletter the “County Monaghan Genealogy: Home to the Little Hills” workshops and training courses, which take place in Monaghan Town and Carrickmacross between this Monday (October 14th) and Thursday week (October 24th), so just to give another pointer for anyone who missed that, Fiona is giving a talk on pre-1800 records in both towns.

This Thursday (October 17th) Fiona will be in Monaghan Town, while next Monday (October 21st) Carrickmacross is the location.

Visit the County Monaghan Genealogy website for more details.

New Blog: Genealogy as Economic Opportunity

Last week we saw the all too rare occurrence of genealogy reaching the discussion in the chambers of Dáil Eireann.

A debate on the Freedom of Information Bill 2013 centred on the thorny old question of “freedom of information” on the one hand, and “data protection” on the other.

Eneclann CEO Brian Donovan has blogged about the issue over on our website:

Last Thursday, October 3rd, during the second stage of the Freedom of Information Bill 2013, Deputy Catherine Murphy, made some very important points about genealogy, freedom of information and what they mean for Ireland, our diaspora, and our future.

Rarely does genealogy get a hearing in the Dáil, so this is a welcome development in its own right. But many of Deputy Murphy’s comments were timely and highlight some of the key challenges facing all those engaged in making the practice of family history easier or even possible.

Click here to read the rest of Brian’s blog

Eneclann in History Ireland

We’re delighted to announce that Fiona Fitzsimons has started a new regular column in the excellent History Ireland magazine.

We all know that family history is the study of real people’s lives, documented not by statistics but by using records of births, marriages, deaths and details of everyday life recorded in newspapers, land and estate records, parish records and legal documents. 

Fiona’s History Ireland column will explore lesser known sources as a means of aiding Irish family history research.

She hopes to delve in a bit more detail into the sheer variety of source material that survives in archives and records repositories in Ireland and the UK, and to explore their use in Irish family history.

Most History Ireland readers will be aware of many of these sources already, but the Valuation Office records, the Registry of Deeds, Petty Sessions Court records or the Landed Estate Court Rentals are under-utilised by family historians, because they are perceived as being too difficult or having a narrower social coverage than is often actually the case.

Over the course of the next year Fiona hopes to show History Ireland readers different methods to help you get the best from the sources, but also to explore other versions of “Irishness” which may question some of the received wisdom of Irish history - for example the number of women running farms and developing businesses; the social mobility of families up and down the social scale over several generations; and whether religion was always a divisive issue amongst people in Ireland in the 1700s, 1800s and 1900s.

To check out Fiona’s regular column pick up a copy of History Ireland at your local newsagent or at selected bookshops. You can also subscribe over on the History Ireland website here.

News of a New Face at our Joint Venture Partners

Finally for this week’s newsletter, we’d like to give a warm welcome to Annelies van den Belt. Annelies is the new CEO at DC Thomson Family History, the Scottish company with whom Eneclann runs findmypast.ie as a joint venture.

Read more about the news here.
 



That's all for now everyone.  Thanks for reading and if you're at the Back To Our Past show, make sure to call over and say hello!





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Best wishes, The Eneclann Team

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