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Homeless Hub Newsletter - March 9, 2017
2017 - The year of prevention

Help us to define homelessness prevention! 

The Canadian Observatory on Homelessness is developing a homelessness prevention framework. The aim of the framework is to define prevention and consider ways we can stop homelessness from happening, rather than waiting until people are in crisis before intervening.

The framework provides a platform to engage in a nation-wide conversation about preventing homelessness. To start that conversation we’ve created a survey to hear your perspectives on what homelessness prevention looks like and what role it should play in ending homelessness in Canada. Please take a moment to fill out the short survey here. Respondents will be entered in a draw to win a free book from the Canadian Observatory on Homelessness.

Take the survey
International Women's Day

International Women's Day

International Women's Day recognizes the achievements of women and marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity. In honour of International Women's Day, celebrated on March 8th, today's newsletter features several resources that highlight the growing percentage of women who are at risk of or are experiencing homelessness.

Homeless Hub Blog Posts:

IS HOMELESSNESS SEXIST?
Abram Oudshoorn
 
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE & HOMELESSNESS
Nadia Ali
HOW DOES HOMELESSNESS AFFECT SENIOR WOMEN?
Emma Woolley
A CONTINUUM OF SERVICES FOR WOMEN & THEIR FAMILIES
Ashley Jellema
Finding Her Home: A gender-based analysis of the homelessness crisis in Winnipeg

Finding Her Home: A gender-based analysis of the homelessness crisis in Winnipeg

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives 

Over 100 years since some women got the vote in Manitoba, homelessness unfortunately is a reality for women in the community. This research brings a gender-based analysis to the homelessness crisis to better understand women's experiences and what women identify is needed. Researchers conducted interviews with 30 women who’ve experienced homelessness in Winnipeg and 10 key informants working in this area. The information was analyzed and the report includes recommendations for action. 

Read the report
A Framework for Ending Women's And Girls’ Homelessness

A Framework for Ending Women's And Girls’ Homelessness

Shelley Yeo, Cheyanne, Ratnam, Emily Paradis, Abe Oudshoorn et al.

New approaches to homelessness are proving impactful, with communities seeing individuals who have been chronically homeless obtaining and maintaining housing in the face of significant concurrent addiction and mental health challenges. However, it has been noted that these approaches have been implemented largely without a gender lens. Best practices in ending homelessness for women and girls have not been included in many community plans, although women are often mentioned as a ‘target’ population. This framework aims to provide municipalities across Canada a tool that they can adapt to their local setting to end homelessness for women and girls.

Access this resource
Keeping Women and Children Housed: Women’s Homelessness Prevention Project

Keeping Women and Children Housed: Women’s Homelessness Prevention Project 

Justice Connect Homeless Law

The Women’s Homelessness Prevention Project is an integrated model of providing legal services that focuses on preventing homelessness through addressing both legal and non-legal needs. It keeps women and children in housing through a combination of legal representation and social work support. Informed by what they’ve learnt from providing legal representation and social work support to over 100 women experiencing or at risk of homelessness, Homeless Law has identified 10 systemic changes that will reduce the risk of homelessness for women and children in Victoria. The report states: ‘evictions into homelessness must be an absolute last resort and reducing barriers to immediate re-housing an urgent priority’.

Read the report
Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Gender, Indigenous Rights, And Energy Development In Northeast British Columbia, Canada

Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Gender, Indigenous Rights, And Energy Development In Northeast British Columbia, Canada

Amnesty International

In this report, Amnesty International calls on the federal and provincial governments to work with Indigenous Peoples organizations and frontline service providers to uphold crucial human rights safeguards in northeast BC. The economic insecurity experienced by many in the northeast is concerning, as economic insecurity is associated with a number of increased risk factors, including violence against women. Indigenous women and girls in northeast BC do not have access to adequate government supports and services to reduce the risk of violence. Frontline service providers supporting marginalized individuals, such as women’s shelters and food banks, describe a situation of constant crisis, as needs outpace their capacity to respond.

Read the report
Report on Homelessness and Domestic Abuse: The Women's Health Improvement Project

Report on Homelessness and Domestic Abuse: The Women's Health Improvement Project

Scottish Women's Aid

This report shows the impact of homelessness on women and makes a number of recommendations for national and local government to prevent homelessness and ensure that women and children get a more appropriate response from the services they approach. Every year in Scotland thousands of women and children are made homeless as a result of domestic abuse. Change, Justice, Fairness: “Why should we have to move everywhere and everything because of him?” is the result of a two year participatory action research project working with a group of women in Fife who had themselves experienced homelessness because of domestic abuse.

Read the report
Background Paper on the Links between Violence against Women and Homelessness

Background Paper on the Links between Violence against Women and Homelessness

FEANTSA

Violence against women is a brutal manifestation of gender inequality and a serious violation of human rights. One in three women in the EU has experienced physical and/or sexual violence was after the age of 15. 1 Increasing attention is paid both at national and European level to violence against women. It is certainly an issue that is not only on the political agenda, but is also being tackled through legislative means: important European legislation has been introduced in recent years.It is important that the needs and views of women who are homeless and are survivors of violence be taken into account in the drawing up of policy and in practice and to ensure that protection from violence and support for victims also reaches women who are home-less and are often living hidden from public view.

Read the paper
Homeless in Europe: Perspectives on Women’s Homelessness

Homeless in Europe: Perspectives on Women’s Homelessness

FEANTSA

Women who are homeless are among the most marginalised groups in our society and their numbers, especially among young women, are increasing. For example, in the UK, women made up 26 per cent of people who accessed homelessness services in 2013. It is believed that many more women are “hidden” homeless. This issue of the Homeless in Europe Magazine aims to raise awareness of the problem and contribute to better understanding what is specific about the experience of homelessness among women and how best to respond to the needs of women who are homeless. It also shares innovative practices that can be replicated elsewhere.

Read the magazine
Differences in Health and Social Support between Homeless Men and Women Entering Permanent Supportive Housing

Differences in Health and Social Support between Homeless Men and Women Entering Permanent Supportive Housing

Winetrobe, H., Wenzel, S., Rhodes, H. et al.
Women's Health Issues, 2017  

Permanent supportive housing (PSH) is the leading intervention to end chronic homelessness. Little is known, however, about gender differences, including potential disparities in physical and mental health and social support, that might inform services available through PSH. This study included 421 homeless adults who were moving into PSH in the Los Angeles area. Compared with men entering PSH, homeless women were younger, less likely to have achieved at least a high school education, and had lower incomes. Women also had more chronic physical health and mental health conditions than men. There is evidence of gender differences in mental health and social support among homeless adults moving into PSH, hence supportive services within housing should be tailored based on gender and other individual needs.

Read the journal article

Life goals and gender differences among chronically homeless individuals entering permanent supportive housing

Bird, M., Rhoades, H., Lahey, J., Cederbaum, J., Wenzel, S
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless, 2017

This research seeks to understand goals and the gender differences in goals among men and women who are transitioning into permanent supportive housing. Men and women experience homelessness differently. Data collected for this study come from a longitudinal investigation of HIV risk behavior and social networks among women and men transitioning from homelessness to permanent supportive housing. As part of this study, 421 baseline interviews were conducted in English with homeless adults scheduled to move into permanent supportive housing; participants were recruited between September 2014 and October 2015. This paper uses goals data from the 418 male-or female-identified respondents in this study. Results identified goal differences in education and general health between men and women that should be taken into account when service providers, policy makers, and advocates are addressing the needs of homeless women.

Read the journal article
Community Workspace on Homelessness

Latest Discussions:


How can we prevent homelessness?

Domestic Violence & Homelessness - International Women's Day

What are some services in your community that support women at risk of homelessness or are experiencing homelessness?
Start your own discussion on the Community Workspace on Homelessness
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