In a nutshell, forestry isn’t often described as exciting.  Yet, that’s exactly how the future of forestry was characterized at WFPA’s annual meeting.

Working Forests Action Network

Dear <<First Name>>,

Forestry is a generational endeavor, a decades-long cycle of growth, harvest and replanting in which patience and careful planning are keys to success.

In a nutshell, forestry isn’t often described as exciting.  Yet, that’s exactly how the future of forestry was characterized at Washington Forest Protection Association’s annual meeting, featuring past, present and future leaders involved in forestry in Washington State.

This new energy is the result of a renaissance in how planners, engineers and consumers are thinking about wood, a rediscovery of wood’s superior attributes coupled with advancements in sustainable forestry and the wood products themselves.

Advancements in forest management practices like the forestry-led Forests & Fish Law have already demonstrated that working forests can exist in harmony with cool, clean streams and fish habitats.

The Pacific Northwest is only place where trees are grown in their native ecosystem,” said guest speaker Dr. Thomas Maness, Dean of the School of Forestry at Oregon State University.  “The most environmentally sustainable place on earth to grow wood is in the Pacific Northwest.”

Our Washington State government has the opportunity to enhance those benefits by following through on its commitment to fund adaptive forest management, a data-based process that allows science --- not politics --- to steer us to the most beneficial practices.

And strong, fire-resistant and versatile cross laminated timber (CLT) is giving architects the freedom to construct large buildings with wood.

Leading conservationist Gene Duvernoy of Forterra said it quite well:

"Think about what's going to come from that next generation [in the industry],” Duvernoy said. "It's really exciting."

Washington State -- with a large supply of wood, an active timber industry and a history of innovation -- has the potential to be the nation's leader in cross-laminated timber and its use in large buildings, Duvernoy said.

The future of forestry, and in particular Washington State’s role in it, looks very bright.

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