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In this week’s newsletter: reading to write, how to separate your work from everyone else’s, and more...

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A newsletter from the desk of Austin Kleon
Nothing we've done was not first met by a I might regret this

Hey y’all,

Here are 10 things I thought were worth sharing this week: 

  1. If you want to be a writer, you have to be a reader first. (You can start by reading with a pencil.)
     
  2. After I wrote about Mary Oliver on paying attention, I decided to re-read her essay collection, Upstream.
     
  3. Richard Serra on how to separate your work from everyone else’s. (I found this quote while reading Leonard Koren’s What Artists Do.) 
     
  4. Ursula K. Le Guin’s ideal routine.
     
  5. I’m enjoying book designer Daniel Benneworth-Gray’s newsletter, Meanwhile
     
  6. My electric toothbrush theory of relativity.
     
  7. The Cleveland Museum of Art has released over 30,000 public domain artworks for remixing and reuse
     
  8. Worth a stream: we were snowed in up on the lake this week, so I watched Desperately Seeking Susan, Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened, and Isle of Dogs. (Here’s how the sushi-making scene was made.)
     
  9. Nick Cave on whether AI will ever be able to write a great song.
     
  10. One reason to get out of bed in the morning.
Thanks for reading. If you like this newsletter and want to support it, forward it to a friend, or better yet, buy them a book!

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xoxo, 

Austin
Austin Kleon

Austin Kleon is the author of Steal Like An Artist and other books.

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