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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Katie Dunham, REDCAT / Katie Dunham Communications
redcatpr@calarts.edu / 213.905.0687 (Do Not Publish)

MEMBERS OF THE PRESS ARE INVITED TO ATTEND
FOR REVIEW AND CONSIDERATION


REDCAT Announces Its
Fall 2022 Season

Sept. - Dec. 2022

Christiane Jatahy: Depois do Silêncio (After the Silence).
Photo by Christophe Raynaud de Lage.

REDCAT’s season of performances, screenings, and exhibitions features
The international debut of William Kentridge’s Houseboy;
World premieres from artist Cassils and playwright Octavio Solis;
New work from Christiane Jatahy, My Barbarian, and SPELLLING;
the Oklahoma Intertribal Noise Symposium 2022;
and an exhibition by pioneering L.A. artist Carl Cheng;
And much more...

LOS ANGELES – Continuing a full year of live performance and art, Roy and Edna Disney CalArts Theater (REDCAT), CalArts' downtown center for contemporary arts presents a fresh slate of dynamic and innovative performances, screenings, and exhibitions, both in person and online – September through December 2022.

“With our Fall 2022 season, we are excited to feature artists who mix disciplines to further experimentation and create novel forms of expression,” said João Ribas, REDCAT’s Steven D. Lavine Executive Director and Vice President for Cultural Partnerships.

The Fall 2022 season kicks off with two cutting-edge programs rescheduled from earlier this year: Doris Duke Award-winning choreographer Faye Driscoll – hailed as a “startingly original talent” by The New York Times – with her most recent work, Thank You For Coming: Space Sept. 15-17; and world-renowned artist and CalArts faculty Sharon Lockhart with her latest film, EVENTIDE (2022), accompanied by a live musical performance with Petra Haden, on Sept. 21.

The season sees REDCAT taking part in several exciting theatrical collaborations. From Sept. 29 to Oct. 1, with CalArts Center for New Performance, REDCAT presents the world premiere of Octavio SolisScene with Cranes. Known for plays of satire, mythology, and steely realism, Solis is considered one of the most prominent Latino playwrights in America. In this production, directed by Chi-wang Yang, a tight-knit East L.A. family is left shattered in the wake of their youngest son's mysterious death.

From Nov. 17 to 20, REDCAT and The Broad Museum present the international debut of artist William Kentridge's durational performance, Houseboy, premiering in conjunction with the exhibition William Kentridge: In Praise of Shadows, on view at The Broad Museum Nov. 12, 2022 through Apr. 9, 2023. Based on the 1956 novel by Cameroonian diplomat Ferdinand Oyono, the performance explores themes of historical participation, archival memory, and post-colonial identity with live music and percussion, Kentridge’s own artwork, and an immersive multimedia experience.

From Dec. 8 to 10, REDCAT and Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles present Double Future, a double-bill performance by My Barbarian, combining ancient Greek theater, mystery plays, and rock opera to tell the story of a religious cult engaging in human sacrifice to maintain the economic status quo.

Sept. 24 kicks off an exciting series of music at REDCAT with Bay Area artist SPELLLING premiering a series of new compositions for voice and synthesizer. On Oct. 8, the Oklahoma Intertribal Noise Symposium 2022 unites American Indian experimental sound artists Autumn Chacon, Kite, Robbie Wing, Warren Realrider, and Nathan Young, artists "creating and destroying sound worlds and embodying Indigenous sonic agency," as Young describes. Leading into the event, artists Alisha Wormsley and Kite present a Black and Indigenous Dreaming Workshop on Oct. 7 and 8. The Angel City Jazz Festival returns to REDCAT on Oct. 22 with musicians Marquis Hill and the John Escreet Trio.

On Oct. 28, writer Virginia Grise and Martha Gonzalez of the GRAMMY Award-winning band Quetzal present Riding the Currents of the Wilding Wind: From Sharp Shooters to Earthmovers, Roaming Dogs, Helicopters in the Sky, Quarantines and Men that Fly, a performance lecture directed by artist Kendra Ware. And on Dec. 4, a host of world-renowned performers from the Los Angeles music scene celebrate legendary composer and musician Anthony Braxton and his remarkable contribution to the fields of improvisation and contemporary composition. 

REDCAT presents Human Measure, the first contemporary dance piece from visual artist Cassils (Art MFA 02), Oct. 13 to 15. In the face of 82 anti-transgender bills currently on the books in the U.S., Cassils demonstrates movements grounded in oppression and resilience, culminating as dancers' bodies impress a stain upon a giant cyanotype. And the annual CalArts Winter Dance returns to REDCAT Dec. 2-3, presenting new work created and performed by faculty-artists from CalArts’ Sharon Disney Lund School of Dance.

On Nov. 3-5, in the new and final part of her trilogy on colonial violence, acclaimed Brazilian theater maker Christiane Jatahy looks at how racism and capitalism are interwoven with Depois Do Silêncio (After the Silence). Writer, actor, art critic, and comedian Christina Catherine Martinez brings her live comedy talk show experience, Aesthetical Relations, to REDCAT on Nov. 11.

This season’s film/video screenings feature a diverse line-up including pioneering filmmaker Ericka Beckman (Art MFA 76); artist Kahlil Joseph with his ongoing conceptual news program, BLKNWS; Spanish-Mexican director Sergi Pedro Ros; and an incredible array of Palestinian, Filipino, queer Indigenous and Mestizx filmmakers.

In its Gallery, REDCAT opens Carl Cheng: Material Behavior, an exhibition of work by the pioneering L.A. artist on October 22. Throughout his nearly six-decade career, Cheng's artistic practice has been a means of exploring the capabilities of natural and manufactured substances. From his early use of emerging plastic technology for 3D photographs to his daily application of resin in his Liquid/Solid Series to his self-sustaining environments, Cheng continues to make art that demonstrates its own materiality and that encourages close observation from viewers.  A reception and artist talk will be held on Oct. 26.

And that’s just the beginning for this extraordinary season at REDCAT. For dates, details, or ticketing information, see below or visit redcat.org.

REDCAT FALL 2022 EVENT LISTINGS:

Sept. 15-17 
Faye Driscoll 
Thank You For Coming: Space

Choreographer Faye Driscoll is a Doris Duke Award-winning performance maker who has been hailed as a "startlingly original talent" by The New York Times. Her most recent work, Thank You For Coming: Space, is a shared rite of passage—a conjuring of the transformative powers of presence and absence. The dance work unfolds within an intimate installation—wired for sound and upheld by pulleys, ropes, and the weight of others—where Driscoll appears alone with the audience. Through an alchemy of body, object, voice, and live sound, she builds a moving requiem for the human body, creating a world that is, like ourselves, alive and forever changeable. 

Sept. 21 
Sharon Lockhart 
EVENTIDE

“Sharon Lockhart's latest film, EVENTIDE (2022), is a meditative, non-narrative single long shot that uses choreography to explore landscape, communal relations, solitary searching, psychic endurance, and the play of light moving through darkness. Locating drama in the real-time shift of evening fading into night, and in the emergence of stars, this is perhaps Lockhart’s most optical and painterly moving image to date, composing figures, scenography, and soundscape into allegory and abstraction. Shot on the Swedish coast with a close-knit group of friends Lockhart has been involved with for years, EVENTIDE is concerned with grieving and the future.” — Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer (Curator)

The program includes a live performance by Petra Haden, as well as a discussion with the artist.

Sept. 24 
SPELLLING
Bay Area artist SPELLLING premieres a series of new compositions for voice and synthesizer. Since the beginning of 2022, she has been working on the challenge of recording one composition a day. Many of these include voice memos taken from her cellphone when away from the studio or on tour. SPELLLING will weave together samples and elements of these compositions in an improvised live performance at REDCAT. She aims to offer insight into the early and deeply intimate stages of her songwriting process that includes digging and remixing ideas still floating between many ethers of possibility.

Sept. 29-Oct. 1
Octavio Solis
Scene with Cranes

World Premiere co-presented with CalArts Center for New Performance
Octavio Solis—known for plays of satire, mythology, and steely realism—is considered one of the most prominent Latino playwrights in America. In this world premiere production, a tight-knit East L.A. family is left shattered in the wake of their youngest son's mysterious death. Devastated, the mother searches for the truth by retracing her son's final steps. In Solis' signature blend of classic and contemporary, he parallels John Sibelius' musical masterwork in a play of the same name. Exquisitely visceral, Chi-wang Yang's direction of Scene with Cranes navigates the many avenues of loss, leaving us stranded in a meditation on grief. 

Scene with Cranes is a project of Duende Calarts, an initiative of the CalArts Center for New Performance dedicated to developing and producing innovative work emerging from Latinx and Latin American communities and sources.Established in 2009 by Marissa Chibás, Duende CalArts brings prominent and emerging Latinx and Latin American artists from the performance community to develop adventurous projects at CNP. It aims to expand aesthetic boundaries and performance discourse, collaborating with national and international Latinx artists and advancing multilingual works.

Oct. 3
Mona Benyamin, Razan Al Salah, and others 
We don't want this song to end

What is more unsettling to an occupier than an occupied people's relentless imagining of potential futures? Among the violence that manifests itself in events documented, circulated, and reiterated by the media, there is another form of aggression in Palestine. It lies outside time, in nonevents designed to fester angst, powerlessness, and eventually invisibility. The subversive acts featured in this shorts program by Mona Benyamin, Razan Al Salah, and others—curated by Zaina Bseiso—consider the power of humor, performance, imagination, and ultimately hope in the strive for liberation.

Oct. 7-8
Alisha Wormsley and Kite
Black and Indigenous Dreaming Workshop

Alisha Wormsley and Kite present a tactile collage of thinking, becoming, speaking, and dreaming—not across from but next to and with each other. The audience is invited to experience a piece from "Black and Indigenous Dreaming Workshop" while lying down and at rest. After doing so, they can then imagine these voices next to them and use this conversation as a starting point for co-dreaming a new world.

Oct. 8 
Autumn Chacon, Kite, Robbie Wing, Warren Realrider, Nathan Young
Oklahoma Intertribal Noise Symposium 2022

American Indian experimental sound artists Autumn Chacon, Kite, Robbie Wing, Warren Realrider, and Nathan Young present a constellation of sonic experiments across genres, inspired by Nathan Young's event "Oklahoma Intertribal Noise Symposium" in Tulsa in 2019. This program includes noise musicians, drone poets, field recordists, and performance artists, "creating and destroying sound worlds and embodying Indigenous sonic agency," as Young describes.

Oct. 13-15
Cassils
Human Measure

Currently in the U.S., there have been 82 anti-transgender bill introduced in the state legislative session, the highest number of anti-transgender bills in U.S. history. Most attacks focus on transgender youth, and 31 states have introduced bills that ban transgender athletes from participating in sports consistent with their gender identities. The world premiere of Cassils' first piece of contemporary dance, Human Measure (2021), is presented against this backdrop. It builds upon Cassils' knowledge of kinesiology, martial arts, and sports science to reinterpret the Anthropometries paintings of painter Yves Klein who, in addition to being an artist, was a judo master. Klein published The Foundations of Judo (1954), a book illustrated with hundreds of photographs of himself performing the movements that form the basis of judo.

Cassils references this work to demonstrate movements grounded in oppression and resilience, culminating as the dancers' bodies impress a stain upon a giant cyanotype—to be exposed the color of "International Yves Klein Blue." A collaboration with choreographer Jasmine Albuquerque—who has worked with the likes of St. Vincent, Devendra Banhart, Laura Marling, and Mike Mills—the performance will draw upon personal safety and vulnerability, problematizing visibility in a moment of heightened violence against the GNC/Trans community. 

Oct.17 
Ericka Beckman
Playful Obsessions: Films

For over four decades, the pioneering work of Ericka Beckman was developed in parallel to the growing presence of video games in our society. Tapping into the inner workings of gaming, as well as the rules that define and govern the expected performance of participants and the increased presence of virtual and computing technologies, Beckman's productions reflect on the tensions between competition and play, scoring and leisure, societal behavior, and identity formation. This program will show some of Beckman's most iconic films, in their analogue form, alongside more recent productions in vibrant digital format. The screening is followed by a conversation and Q&A with Ericka Beckman.

Oct. 22, 2022 - Feb. 23, 2023
Carl Cheng: Material Behavior
Artist Talk: Oct. 26

Throughout his nearly six-decade career, Carl Cheng's artistic practice has been a means of exploring the capabilities of natural and manufactured substances. From his early use of emerging plastic technology for 3D photographs to his daily application of resin in his Liquid/Solid Series to his self-sustaining environments, Cheng continues to make art that demonstrates its own materiality and that encourages close observation from viewers. 

Oct. 22
Marquis Hill and John Escreet Trio
Angel City Jazz Festival 

The Angel City Jazz Festival, now in its 15th year, consistently features the most innovative and original musicians working today, balancing established artists with emerging talent, and focusing on West Coast creative jazz, past, present, and future.

Marquis Hill's New Gospel Revisited
From his beginnings as one of Chicago's most thrilling young trumpeters, to his current status as an internationally renowned musician, composer, and bandleader, Marquis Hill has worked tirelessly to break down the barriers that divide musical genres. Contemporary and classic jazz, hip-hop, R&B, Chicago house, neo-soul—to Hill, they're all essential elements of the profound African-American creative heritage he's a part of. "It all comes from the same tree," he says. "They simply blossomed from different branches… New Gospel was my debut album and my first completed production. To revisit this music in a fresh way, with a new band has been uniquely invigorating—and hugely rewarding."

John Escreet Trio
Over the course of his career, John Escreet has earned a reputation as one of the most active and diverse pianist/composers working in jazz and improvised music. Bursting onto the scene with his 2008 debut album Consequences, Escreet quickly earned a reputation as one of the most exciting new pianist/composers to have emerged in recent years, with DownBeat Magazine proclaiming "John Escreet's recent debut Consequences signals the jumpstart of a new voice in jazz." 

Oct. 24 
Arden Rod Condez, Carla Pulido Ocampo, Angel Velasco Shaw
Lives of Devotion: Stories from the Philippines

Lives of Devotion features three storytelling approaches that recast myth and iterations of imperialism across recent history. Dandansoy (2021) finds a young man assisting an aging "aswang," a malevolent shape-shifting figure, to the mythical lake of Payaw. As Arden Rod Condez's take on a popular Visayan song about leaving behind a beloved, this film reckons with the desertion of family and tradition while suggesting new forms of kinship possible. Different times crash in Tokwifi (2019), as a movie star from the 1950s encounters a Bontok Igorot man. Immersing in the communities of the Mountain Province, Carla Pulido chooses the myth of Tokwifi to bridge cultural shifts and recent politics. Alongside these two fictional renditions of love and local lore is Angel Velasco Shaw's Nailed (1992), a poetic documentary investigating the notion of faith and Philippines' 400 years of Spanish and American colonization. This montage of fragmented stories and stylized performances explores the performative aspects of "pagan" and Catholic religious practices while challenging the long game of imperialism in Philippine society.

Oct. 28
Virginia Grise with Quetzal
Riding the Currents of the Wilding Wind: From Sharp Shooters to Earthmovers, Roaming Dogs, Helicopters in the Sky, Quarantines and Men that Fly

From sharp shooters to earthmovers, roaming dogs, helicopters in the sky, quarantines and men that fly, musical director Martha Gonzalez and writer Virginia Grise chronicle the process of adapting Helena María Viramontes' epic novel, Their Dogs Came with Them, in a medium security women's prison and the site-specific staging of the play under the I-19 Freeway with a community cast of scholars, organizers and actors. Directed by Kendra Ware, this performance lecture includes live music by members of the band Quetzal, giving audiences a sneak peek into their most recent project together, a concept album, Riding the Currents of the Wilding Wind.

Nov. 3-5
Christiane Jatahy
Depois Do Silêncio (After the Silence)

In the new and final part of her trilogy on colonial violence, acclaimed Brazilian theater maker Christiane Jatahy looks at how racism and capitalism are interwoven. From the global slave trade to the contemporary politics of the likes of Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro, little has changed. There are those who possess land, freedom, and their own identity, and those whose existence is of no value. In the award-winning novel Torto Arado by Itamar Vieira Júnior, the source material for the play, the female protagonists are engaged in a struggle against such a world order—and for an opportunity for change and new world making. In deep community collaboration, Jatahy and her actors, Gal Pereira, Juliana França, Lian Gaia and Tatiana Salem, delve deep into Brazil's history and, by extension, into that of European profiteers, too. To tell the story of the unresolved colonial violence that endures to this day, Jatahy blends a surprising mix of two art forms—theater and film—allowing reality and fiction to overlap. Within the discourse on structural racism and geopolitical realities, Jatahy has firmly established her place in the world's theater landscape. Her stories are those of resistance.

Nov. 7 
Doane Tulugaq Avery, Fox Maxy, Roberto Fatal, Peshawn Bread, Xandra Ibarra
Decolonizing the Body 

Gender binary is a colonial construct. Since time immemorial, Indigenous peoples and cultures across the world have embraced a complex range of genders and sexualities. Indigenous peoples continue to fight against oppression, embracing a full spectrum of identities. These queer Indigenous and Mestizx filmmakers are pushing the boundaries of the medium and of gender expression and representation. They work to decolonize the body and the screen through their personal stories. This program features Gently, Jennifer by Doane Tulugaq Avery, Gush by Fox Maxy, Chaac and Yum by Roberto Fatal, The Daily Life of Mistress Red by Peshawn Bread, and Colonial Peeps by Xandra Ibarra (also known as La Chica Boom).

Nov. 11 
Christina Catherine Martinez
Aesthetical Relations

Aesthetical Relations is a live comedy talk show experience by writer, actor, art critic, and comedian Christina Catherine Martinez, bringing together comedians, artists, video screenings, a rotating house band, and other multimedia delights. Loosely modeled on the late-night talk show format, guests perform unclassifiable feats of entertainment, followed by a brief heart-to-heart with the magnanimous host, Ms. Martinez. Bits and interruptions are sprinkled throughout, and the fourth wall is broken, reassembled, and mixed into a smoothie for your pleasure.

Nov. 17-20 
William Kentridge 
Houseboy 

REDCAT and The Broad present the international debut of artist William Kentridge's durational performance Houseboy. Based on the 1956 novel by Cameroonian diplomat Ferdinand Oyono, the performance explores themes of historical participation, archival memory, and post-colonial identity. This performance uses the protagonist's diary and personal experiences as source material for the narrative. South African performers are featured and a large charcoal drawing by Kentridge serves as the theatrical backdrop. Accompanied by live music and percussion, Kentridge's staged interpretation of Oyono's novel creates an immersive multimedia experience that muses on agency and trauma and directly folds into the artist's multidisciplinary practice on view at The Broad.

Co-presented with The Broad Museum in conjunction with the William Kentridge: In Praise of Shadows exhibition on view November 12, 2022–April 9, 2023.

Nov. 21 
Kahlil Joseph
Another BLKNWS 

Kahlil Joseph's multi-faceted practice embraces cinema, visual art, sound, and media. His films and video installations are deployed in both mainstream environments and the art world, from the Venice Biennale to a Black-owned barbershop in Washington, D.C. Joseph was one of the founders of the Underground Museum, a pioneering independent art museum, exhibition space, and community hub in Los Angeles.

Premiered at Sundance 2020, Joseph's ongoing conceptual news program BLKNWS is a multi-site video installation, presented as a one-hour broadcast at REDCAT. The constantly changing two-channel project—with its uninterrupted flow of found footage, originally produced segments, and current and historical news clips expanding on the current power of broadcast journalism—ultimately does away with hierarchy of information. 

Dec. 2-3
CalArts Winter Dance
RE: Repertory 

CalArts Dance presents new work created and performed by our faculty-artists. Featuring the wide-ranging embodied histories our faculties carry as performers and creators, these new projects take inspiration from repertory works that faculty members have danced, admired, or are eager to research or revisit. Performed by the Sharon Disney Lund School of Dance's awesome students.

Dec. 4 
Vicki Ray, Jonathan Pinson, Tim Feeney, and a host of world-renowned performers from the Los Angeles music scene
Celebrating Anthony Braxton 

Recognized as one of the most important musicians, educators, and creative thinkers of the past 50 years, Anthony Braxton has been widely celebrated for his revolutionary workdrawing from sources as disparate as John Coltrane, Karlheinz Stockhausen, and 12th-century mystic Hildegard von Bingen. In this wide-ranging celebration of his work (produced and curated by his former student and frequent collaborator Steve Lehman), a multi-generational collection of the most celebrated musicians—including Vicki Ray, Jonathan Pinson, and Tim Feeney—in and around Los Angeles pay tribute to Braxton's remarkable contribution to the fields of improvisation and contemporary composition. 

Dec. 5
Sergi Pedro Ros
Laberinto Yo'eme (Yo'eme's Labyrinth)

Spanish-Mexican director Sergi Pedro Ros' documentary Laberinto Yo'eme (Yo'eme's Labyrinth) spotlights the difficulties facing the Yaquis of northwestern Sonora, Mexico, in defense of their lives and ancestral land. Since 2010, the government of Sonora, through the Independencia Aqueduct, has illegally diverted millions of cubic meters of water from the Yaqui River, causing a serious drought for the tribe and endangering their lives. At the same time, its territory has been flooded with drugs and violence. Yaquis seek answers and find strength for their resistance in the depths of their cultural identity.

Dec. 8-10 
My Barbarian
Double Future

REDCAT and Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles present Double Future, a double-bill performance by My Barbarian (Malik Gaines, Jade Gordon, and Alexandro Segade). Recently performed as the final act of their survey exhibition at the Whitney, You Were Born Poor and Poor You Will Die (Performa 05 at Participant Inc., 2005) combines ancient Greek theater, mystery plays, and rock opera to tell the story of a religious cult engaging in human sacrifice to maintain the economic status quo. Silver Minds (Aspen Art Museum, 2005) employs conventions of Noh theater, New Wave music, and science fiction, in a series of ghost stories about climate change and resource extraction, told from the point of view of tourists who time travel to the past to enjoy nature, which no longer exists. Re-performing works they created almost two decades ago, My Barbarian responds to the contemporary moment with prescient works that address class struggle and environmental collapse. Performed as a sung and spoken-word recital with musical accompaniment, the members of My Barbarian are joined by musicians Tomas Fujiwara on drums, Ethan Philbrick on cello, and RaShonda Reeves on keyboards. 

In keeping with current Los Angeles County public health requirements and Music Center policy, and for the safety and comfort of our community, all patrons and guests must provide proof of full vaccination, including a booster if eligible. 

For more information, press comps, or artist interviews, please contact Katie Dunham at redcatpr@calarts.edu.

REDCAT | The Roy and Edna Disney/CalArts Theater
REDCAT, CalArts' downtown center for contemporary arts, is a multidisciplinary center for innovative visual, performing and media arts founded by CalArts in the Walt Disney Concert Hall complex in downtown Los Angeles. Through performances, exhibitions, screenings and literary events, REDCAT introduces diverse audiences, students and artists to the most influential developments in the arts from around the world, and gives artists in this region the creative support they need to achieve national and international stature. REDCAT continues the tradition of the California Institute of the Arts, its parent organization, by encouraging experimentation, discovery and lively civic discourse.

California Institute of the Arts (CalArts) has set the pace for educating professional artists since 1970. Offering rigorous undergraduate and graduate degree programs through six schools—art, critical studies, dance, film/video, music, and theater—CalArts has championed creative excellence, critical reflection, and the development of new forms and expressions. As successive generations of faculty and alumni have helped shape the landscape of contemporary arts, the institute first envisioned by Walt Disney encompasses a vibrant, eclectic community with global reach, inviting experimentation, independent inquiry, and active collaboration and exchange among artists, artistic disciplines and cultural traditions. 

REDCAT is located at 631 West 2nd Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012, within the Walt Disney Concert Hall complex.

GENERAL INFORMATION: For current program and exhibition information, visit redcat.org

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